Thursday, January 12, 2012

Isn't the Aging Brain Wonderful?

Now that I am getting older I realize that I have taken my body for granted all of these years. I now am aware of body parts I didn't even know I had when I was younger. I didn't know what the hell a prostate gland was when I was in my teens and twenties. But in the past few years after going to the bathroom more often, getting up in the middle of the night to pee and the loss of hydraulic pressure when going, I now know what a prostate is and what BPH is.

I never gave my knees much of a thought and after growing out of childhood asthma I never gave my lungs much thought either, as I bounded up flights of stairs. Now when I walk up a flight of stairs I feel as though I have climbed Mt. Everest. I never knew there were muscles in my back until now, when I am sorely reminded of that fact every single day. I didn't know what my sinuses were until a few years ago, when I had teeth pulled, just to find out I had sinusitis. I never gave much thought to my bowels, as they worked whenever I wanted them to work. Now with IBS, my bowels have a mind of their own, which is usually in disagreement with my own mind. And of course my eyesight was perfect, being able to see far and near. Now after years of being glued to a microscope and the effects of aging, I either have to get longer arms or use those drug store magnifying glasses.

The one part of the human body that I never ever thought of and I think most people never think of is the brain. It has always worked, sometimes not as hard as I would have liked it to work, but it did work. As I find my other body parts are not working up to snuff, I am beginning to see my brain backfire. The other day I was having lunch with a couple of friends and mentioned that I had to stop and get milk on the way home. I stopped at 7-Eleven and got everything but the milk. Quite often I go to the store for only one specific item and return home without that item, but with many things I really didn't want. I find many times that when people introduce someone to me I forget their names a few minutes later. I think actually I really didn't want to know who they were in the first place. I find that I usually don't forget big things or very important things, but the little things in life. I occasionally forget my phone, my watch, my wallet and the exact time I am supposed to meet someone. I think most of the time I am just not paying attention. I hope. I also, at times have a little trouble remembering what I had for dinner the preceding day. No big deal.

I guess being a little forgetful has to be accepted with the aging process, but what is odd is the things we remember. I can remember the names of every kid in my first grade class at Hamilton Street School. I can remember details of childhood birthday parties and what I received as birthday and Christmas presents. I can remember events from my childhood as if they happened yesterday. I can remember the details of shows like The Life of Riley, The Pinky Lee Show, The People's Choice and Our Miss Brooks. They were on over 50 years ago. When it is very hot and humid I can remember sitting at home on a snow day and watching the snow fall from my living room.

What also is strange is that I remember only the good and pleasant things. I had very severe asthma and other allergies growing up, but I have little memory of that. It is almost like these are selective memories that we consciously have no control over.  Many times I will lie on the bed for a rest and daydream of playing tennis, doing gymnastics, climbing or running a race, yet there is no way in hell I could do that now. It's another game our brain plays on us. I guess it is like the old saying, "The mind is willing, but the body is weak." Even when I am at the gym there is a big difference in what I can envision doing and what I can actually do. So depressing.

I guessed most people see these changes when they retire or approach retirement age. I really didn't feel that bad about it just beginning now, until I saw the results of the latest research from University College London, that brain function begins to decline at the age of 45. That means it has been happening for a long time and I didn't even know it! Another cruel trick of the brain. Oh well. We have no choice, but to get old, but I think I will exercise my brain more, from now on. If I can remember.

                                          A Youthful Human Brain



                                                A Retired Brain

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Ablog about liberal politics andsocial issues